High-Victorian House for a Bay of East River, 1883.

NY Victorian.

A RESIDENCE, COSTING- $4,000, COMPLETE.
This plan is for a commodious, convenient residence, economically constructed with appliances for heating, ventilation, water, etc., complete.....

ELEVATION (picture, above).
The outlines are irregular, and agreeably conform to the site for which it is planned-- an elevated, undulating and picturesque point, fringed with forest trees, and over-looking the waters of a bay of the East River. It fronts eastward, bringing the conservatory on the warm, or southern side. The position of the tower, and its size, make it a prominent feature, and very valuable for an elevated outlook commanding extensive and interesting views. The exterior ornamentaion is neat and effective, and being mostly of open timber work, is simple of construction. The inclined grounds to the right bring most of the foundation at that side above ground, and gives good sized openings to the finished basement

NY Victorian.

...CELLAR AND BASEMENT (fig. 85).
Hight[sic] of walls in main part, 7 feet; in the kitchen end, 8 feet; when floored, 7 feet. That under the main part is for cellar purposes, to contain the furnace, bins for fuel and vegetables, with six small windows for light and air. The kitchen cellar part is floored and plastered, well lighted, contains a range, boiler, sink, wash-tubs, and a force-pump. The pantry adjoining the kitchen is shelved on three sides, and has a dumb-waiter leading to the dining-room pantry above. The outside entrance to the kitchen and cellar is by the area at the rear. A convenient stairway leads from the front entry in the basement to the rear entry in the first story...

NY Victorian.

FIRST STORY (fig. 86)
Hight of ceiling in main part, 10 feet; in the wing, 9 feet. The principal entrance has double front and vestibule doors to a large hall, 9½ by 18½ feet. Small closets at each side of the vestibule serve for umbrellas, overshoes, etc. At the left, double doors, leading to the parlor, and further on a door leads to the library, at the right, one to the dinner-room, and one at the rear, to the back entry. The parlor is of ample size, and adjoins the library through sliding-doors. Each of these rooms has hard-wood mantels, is well lighted from without by large windows, and both have sash-doors leading to the conservatory. The latter is finished with a concrete bottom, and altogether costs but $150. By a little effort at selection and arrangement of plants, this apartment may be made a constant source of interest and pleasure. The dining-room has outlooks in three directions, and communicates directly with the porch, hall, the rear entry, and a pantry having a dumb-waiter to the basement. The rear entry is cut off from the main hall (to save the latter from much common use and wear), and has a wash-bowl and stairs leading to the basement. The rear porch and dining-room pantry are both under a roof similar to that shown for the front piazza; the pantry extending to the outer face forms an alcove of the porch. The main stairs to the second story are of the "quarter circle" pattern, with niche near the top, and have a 10-inch paneled newel, a 2¼ by 4½-inch molded rail, and 2¼-inch fluted ballusters, all of hard-wood.....

NY Victorian.

SECOND STORY (fig. 87).
Hight of ceiling in main part, 9 feet; in wing, 8 feet. The divisions are: a hall, three chambers, a bedroom, bath-room, and six closets, all of ample dimensions. Mantel shelves with trusses of hard-woods are put in each chamber. The stairs to the attic are placed above those of the first story, which are thus made continuous to the upper hall.....

NY Victorian.

ATTIC (fig.88).
Hight of finished ceiling, 9 feet. This is divided into a hall, two chambers, a bedroom, and two closets. The stairs to the tower are "boxed in" with narrow, double-dressed beaded ceiling, and have a paneled door at the foot.....

TOWER.
Size of floor plan (not shown), 9½ feet square. Hight of side walls to top of plate, 6 feet, and continued along the under side of the rafters at an angle of 45 degrees to the ceiling, which is 9 feet high. The boxing of the attic stairs extends 2 feet above the floor, and has a molded cap along the top.....

CONSTRUCTION.
Foundation walls of hard brick and good mortar. Cellar bottom is levelled with concrete. The frame is of seasoned spruce. Enclosing of first quality pine clapboards laid on felt and dressed sheating. Roofing of "Chapman" slate, laid on tarred felt and sheathing. Gutters and leaders of IX tin. Floors of narrow spruce.

Plastering, three coats, hard finished. Casing and moldings of clear pine. Doors all paneled and molded. Sash of best make, four lights to each window, and hung to balance weights. Blinds to each window above the foundation; shutters to kitchen windows. Painting, two coats of best materials. The hard-woods oiled. Plumbing: the tank (not shown) placed in the hall of the attic, just over the bath-room, is 3 by 4 by 6 feet, lined with lead: bath-tub, seat-closet, and wash-bowl in rear entry; range, boiler, sink, wash-tubs, and a force-pump in the kitchen; all connected with proper lead pipes for hot and cold water. A 4-inch soil-pipe leads from the bath-room to a 5-inch drain of vitrified tile pipe, converying all waste to a cesspool 50 feet from the house. The soil pipe is ventilated by a pipe leading from it to above the roof, with a T connection at the top. The heater is enclosed with brick, and has pipes to convey warmed air to the halls and rooms of the first and second stories. Bells from the front door to the rear entry, and from the second story hall to the attic and kitchen, are put in with wires passing through tubes concealed from sight. Speaking-tubes are put in, leading from the dining-room to the kitchen. The contract requires all done in a workmanlike and substantial manner, and of materials best adapted to their several purposes.....

COST.
Any one at all familiar with building, will, by going over the following items of cost, learn the character of this house. The total of these items might easily be doubled if desirable, without changing the plans in the least, simply by increasing the expense in the details of finish. Whenever employed to prepare plans, our first inquiry is as to the amount to be appropriated for building, next to ascertain the accommodation required, the facts as to site, learn all possible of the charactertics and tastes of the owner and his family, then prepare plans to meet all the requirements, without exceeding the amount to be expended, and in no other way can an architect evidence the merits of his profession.....

ESTIMATE.
Cost of materials and labor, viz.:
132 yards excavation, at 20c. per yard.....................................$26.40
24,000 brick (furnished and laid) at $12 per M.............................288.00
80 feet blue stone, at 15c. per ft..........................................12.00
1,250 yards plastering, at 25c. per yard...................................312.50
240 feet cornice, at 30c. per ft............................................72.00
84 yards of concrete, 30c. yer yard.........................................25.20
5,500 feet timber, at $15 per M.............................................82.50
200 joists, at 15c. each, $30.00; 350 wall strips, at 11c. each, $38.50.....68.50
550 flooring (inside), at 18c. each.........................................99.00
50 flooring (outside), at 25c. each.........................................12.50
520 sheathing, at 15c. each.................................................78.00
500 clap-boards, at 20c. each..............................................100.00
Outside cornices............................................................45.00
27 squares slate, at $9 per square.........................................243.00
270 feet gutters and leaders, at 10c. per ft................................27.00
Veranda and porch (complete)................................................60.00
600 lbs. nails, at 3c. per lb...............................................18.00
7 cellar windows (complete), at $4 each.....................................28.00
4 kitchen windows (complete), at $6 each....................................24.00
23 plain windows (complete), at $8 each....................................184.00
11 dormer windows (complete), at $12 each..................................132.00
45 doors (complete), at $7 each............................................315.00
4 stairs (complete)........................................................100.00
3 mantels and 6 shelves, $108; plumbing, $400..............................508.00
Furnace, etc., $250; conservatory, $150....................................400.00
Bells, speaking tubes, $19; carting, $30....................................49.00
Painting...................................................................150.00
Carpenter's labor, not included above......................................400.00
Incidentals................................................................140.40

Total cost of the building, complete.....................................$4000.00

22 Victorian house designs
Cottage Houses
by
S. B. Reed, Architect, 1884
and
Victorian Houses Collection
DOWNLOAD: 8 PDFs

Victorian House Plan Collection
Purchase in Catalog

22 Victorian Cottage House Plans for Village and Country Homes. Together with Complete Plans and Specifications. By S. B. Reed, Architects, Author of "House Plans for Everybody," etc. with over One Hundred Illustrations. Originally published in 1884, New York, by Orange Judd Company. Republished, 2001-2006, Merrymeeting Archives,LLC. 136 e-pages, 15.5MB PDF.

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