Villa in the Gothic Style, 1845.
Part III: Details of Library, Section and Details, and Details.

DETAILS OF LIBRARY.- The drawing marked A, is part of the elevation of the bookcases and one of the library doors, and also part of the plaster cornice. The door is 8 feet high, by 3 feet 9½ inches wide. The small quatrefoil panels in the lock rails are sunk ½ and inch with a cavetto and fillet moulding. The form of the other panels and mouldings will be understood vy the drawing. The frieze over the door is supported by ornamental corbels, the spaces between them being paneled, as shownb on the drawing. The lower part ot the bookcase is divided into two compartments by a pilaster 4¼ inches broad; each compartment is shut in by folding doors, 1 foot 11 inches high, by 1 foot 3½ inches wide in the clear of the bead on the shutting joint. The shelf over the lower part of the bookcase rests on the pilasters, and small corbels placed between them. The upper part of the bookcase is divided into two compartments by a three quarter column, 3½ inches diameter, finished with a moulded base, and ornmental capital. The doors are 6 feet 1 inch high, and 2 feet 6 inches wide; the form of the Gothic tops and cusping of the doors are shown on the drawing. Should glass be thought too expensive, the same form of door may be equally well adapted for cloth or trelles work. The form of the frieze, cornice, embrasures, and other ornamental parts, will be best understood by the drawing. The plaster cornice is 2 feet 1 inch on the wall, and 1 foot 4 inches on the ceiling. It is intended that the ceiling be formed into panels, by mouldings on the surface, as shown on the drawing. The drawing marked B, shows the plan of the upper part of the bookcase, and also the plan of the door and door finishing. The door stiles are 5 inches broad in the clear of the moulding, by 2¼ inches thick; the panels are 7¾ inches broad between the mouldings, by ⅝ of an inch thick. The mouldings are 3⅛ inches thick, by 2¼ inches broad, grooved on the inner edge, so as to receive the panels, and on the outer edge, so as to receive the stiles. In making doors on this principle, the mouldings are joined round the panels, the mitres being properly secured by screw nails; the framing is tongued, so as to correspond with the outer edge of the mouldings; then the moulded panels are put into the door in the same manner as common panels. This method, although more expensive, is much preferable for hardwood or even fir doors, where a good finish is required; the mouldings are njot so liable to warp as when planted on the panels, not are there any nails required, which always give a bad appearance to hardwood doors. The method of framing the pilasters and bookcase will be understood by the drawing; and the various dimensions will be ascertained by the scale. The drawing marked C, is a section of the bookcase and plaster cornice. The section of the lower part of the bookcase is cut through the centre of one of the doors. The door framing is 4 inches broad in the clear of the mouldings, by 1½ inches thick; the panels are ⅞ of an inch thick, kept flush with the inside of the framing. The small pilasters project 1¼ inch in front of the doors, and the large pilasters 3 inches. The section of the upper part of the bookcase is cut through the centre of one of the sash doors; the framing is 3 inches broad, by ¾ inch thick. The columns project 2⅝ inches in front of the sash doors, and the pilaster 4¾ inches. The shelves are 1⅛ inches thick, by 12 inches broad; the bearers for supporting the shelves can be place in the racks at ny height, to correspond with the size of the books; and in order to deep the bearers from falling out of the racks, the shelf is checked down ⅛ of an inch on them. The drawing marked D, is part of the plan of the lower part of the bookcase.

SECTION AND DETAILS.- In order to make the Section as easily understood as possible, I shall point out in what direction the Section line cuts the various apartments on each floor. On the sunk floor it passes through the cellars, in a line perpendicular with the section line on the principal floor; the apartments shown on the section being all dark, can be only used as beer or spirit cellars. The doors are 7 feet 4 inches high, by 3 feet wide; the floors are paved with stone; the foot base, door jambs, and soffits, are also stone. The form of the brick arches are represented on the drawing. The Section on the principal floor, PLATE XIX., is cut through the centre of the Dining-room B, and Library C, runing on a straight line through the rooms D and E, diverging to the centre of the vestibule N. The section of the Dining-room B, shows the sleeper joists, foot base, dado lining, chimney-piece, doors, and window finishing, plater cornice, and ceiling. The sleeper joists are 8 inches deep, by 2½ inches tick. The foot base is 1 foot high, including the moulding; the dado lining is 1 foot 10 inches high from the top of the base to the underside of the surbase, and from the floor to the top of the surbase 3 feet 3 inches. The window breasts are 2 feet high above the floor, the shutters show one panel in front, cusped at the top, but the back is divided into four panels, by rails dovetailed into the back of the panel. The doors are 8 feet high, by 3 feet 10 inches wide, finished with architraves and embattled cornices. The chimney-piece is 3 feet 6 inches wide in the clear, and 5 feet 6 inches wide over the jambs, by 3 feet 6 inches high in the clear, and 4 feet 9 inches high to the top of the shelf. The plaster cornice is 11 inches deep from the underside of the beams; the beams are 1 foot broad, and the panels are 4½ inches sunk. The section of the Ante-room D, shows the door, foot base, and plaster cornice. The foot base, including the upper fascia, is 1 foot 8 inches high; the door is 8 feet high, by 3 feet 8 inches wide. The plaster cornice, including the frieze, is 1 foot 2 inches on the wall, and 8 inches on the ceiling. The section of the Vestibule N, shows the foot base, entrance to the staircase, groined ceiling, and part of the stair and staircase window. The foot base is 1 foot 6 inches high, including the upper fascia; the foot base in the vestibule, staircase, and passages, should be stone. The entrance to the staircase is 5 feet 6 inches wide, and 11 feet 6 inches high, from the floor to the top of the soffet of the arch; the archway is finished with small columns, crowned with ogee canopies, supported on ornamental corbels. The groined ceiling is 15 feet high from the foor to the centre of the arch, and 11 feet 9 inches at the sprint. The section of the Parlour E, show the foot base, door, and plaster cornice. The foot base, including the upper fascia, is 1 foot 8 inches high; the door is 8 feet high, by 3 feet 8 inches wide; the plaster cornice, including the frieze, is 1 foot 6 inches on the wall, and 9 inches on the ceiling. The section of the Library C, shows the sleeper joists, foot base, section of the chimney-piece, bookcase, door and window finishing, and plaster cornice. The sleeper joists and window finishing are the same as those described for the Dining-room B; and the door, bookcase, and plaster cornice, are detailed, PLATE XXIII. The foot base is 10 inches high, including the moulding; the chimney-piece is 3 feet 3 inches high in the clear, and 4 feet 9 inches high to the top of the shelf. The joists over the Library are 9 inches deep, by 2½ inches thick, supported by cast-iron beams, 10½ inches deep, by 1¾ inch thick, with flanges on each side, on which the ceiling joists are hung; the ceiling joists are 5 inches deep, by 1¾ inch thick. The joists over the Dining-room are 9 inches deep, by 2½ inches thick, supported on truss-beams 1 foot deep, by 8 inches thick; the ceiling joists are hung; the ceiling joists are 4 inches deep, by 1¾ inch thick, jung from the floor joists in a transverse direction. The joists over the other apartments on the principal floor, are 11 inches deep, by 2½ inches thick, placed 1 foot 3½ inches apart. The section of the Chamber floor, PLATE XX., is cut in a straight line through the centre of the Bed-rooms A and E. The section of the Bed-room E, shows the foot base, door and window finishing, chimney-piece, and plaster cornice. The foot base is 1 foot 4 inches high, including the upper fascia; the doors are 7 feet 6 inches high, by 3 feet 3 inches wide; the window breasts are 2 feet high above the floor; the chimney-piece is 3 feet wide in the clear, and 5 feet wide over the jambs, by 3 feet high in the clear, and 4 feet 4 inches high to the top of the shelf; the plaster cornice is 10 inches on the wall, and 5 inches on the ceiling. The doors, foot base, and other finishing in the Bed-rooms B, C, D, are all of the same dimensions. The foot base is 1 foot high, including the moulding; the doors are 7 feet 6 inches high, by 3 feet 3 inches wide. The plaster cornice in the room B, is 9 inches on the wall, and 6 inches on the ceiling; in the room C, it is 10 inches on the wall, and 6 inches on the ceiling; and in the room D, it is 11 inches on the wall, and 5 inches on the ceiling. The various parts of finishing shown on the section of the Bed-room A, are of the same dimensions as that described in the Bed-room E. The joists over the Bed-room floor, are 10 inches deep, by 2½ inches thick, placed 1 foot 3½ inches apart. The Section through the rooms on the Attic floor, and also through the roof, runs on a line perpendicular with the section line on the Chamber floor. The finishings in the various rooms shown on the Attic floor, are all of the same dimensions. The doors are 6 feet 8 inches high, by 2 feet 11 inches wide; the foot base is 8 inches high; the window breasts are 2 feet high above the floor, and the windows are 4 feet high in the clear, and 3 feet 10 inches high to the top of the shelf, by 2 feet 8 inches wide in the clear, and 4 feet 2 inches wide over the jambs. The ridge boards shown in the roof are 1 foot deep, by 1½ inch thick. The camber or platform joists are 1 foot deep, by 2½ inches thick, placed 1 foot 3½ inches apart; the rafters are 9½ inches deep at the bottom, and 8 inches at the top, by 2¼ inches thick; the baulks are 6 inches deep, by 2 inches thick.

DETAILS.- The drawing marked A, is part of an elevation of the inside of the staircase window on the Elevation, PLATE XX., showing the form of the tracery and finishing. The sash-frame is divided into two compartments by a stile which forms the top into two trefoil arches, the part of the mullions which branch off to each side, form the compartments between the mullions into quartrefoil arches, being the form of the stone on the outside. The lining of the window jamb is shown by dotted lines. The drawing marked B, is part of the plan of the window, showing the form of the stone mullions, also the sash-frame and inside mullions; the method of framing the wood finishing will be understood by the drawing, and the different sizes will be ascertained by the scale.

Part I: Ground Plan and Front Elevation.
Part II: Chamber Floor, Back Elevation, Details and Plan of Roof.
Part III: Details of Library, Section and Details, and Details.

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