Villa in the Gothic Style, 1845.
Part II: Chamber Floor, Back Elevation, Details and Plan of Roof.

CHAMBER FLOOR PLAN AND BACK ELEVATION.- The space marked A, on the Plan, represents a Bed-room, 19 feet 6 inches, by 18 feet; height of ceiling 11 feet 6 inches. B, Bed-Room, 15 feet 8 inches, by 14 feet; height 11 feet 6 inches. C, Dressing-room, 12 feet 10 inches, by 11 feet 10 inches, exclusive of the bay, 6 feet 8 inches, by 2 feet 10 inches; height 11 feet 10 inches. D, Bed-Room,, 15 feet 8 inches, by 14 feet 8 inches; height 11 feet 10 inches; this room may be used as a Dressing-room, if required. E, Bed-Room, 20 feet, by 18 feet; height 11 feet 6 inches. F, Bed-Room,, 19 feet 9 inches, by 16 feet 3 inches; height 11 feet 6 inches. G, Dressing-Room, 13 feet 3 inches, by 12 feet; height 11 feet 6 inches. H, Bath-Room, 16 feet by 9 feet, and 11 feet high; the floor of this room is raised 6½ inches above the level of the passage. K, Nursery, 17 feet 8 inches, by 12 feet; height of ceiling 10 feet 10 inches. L, Bed-Room,, 16 feet 3 inches, by 11 feet 8 inches; height 10 feet 10 inches. M, Water-Closet, 9 feet 4 inches, by 4 feet 9 inches; height of ceiling 11 feet 6 inches. N, Water-Closet,, 4 feet 8 inches, by 4 feet; height 10 feet. O, Closet, 7 feet by 6 feet, and 11 feet 6 inches high. P, Passage, from the Staircase to the Bed-room A, 15 feet long, by 5 feet wide; height 11 feet 6 inches. R, Passage, leading from the passage P, 8 feet 6 inches long, by 4 feet 8 inches wide; height 11 feet 6 inches. S, Passage, from the Staircase to the Bed-room E, 15 feet 9 inches long, by 5 feet wide, and 11 feet 6 inches high. T, Passage, from the back Staircase to the passage S, the length of this passage, from the Staircase to the first archway, is 5 feet; width 4 feet 2 inches, and the length betwixt the archways is 10 feet 10 inches, by 5 feet 10 inches; height 10 feet 10 inches; this floor is 3 feet 3 inches below the level of the passage S; the length, from the second archway to the passage S, is 13 feet 3 inches, by 4 feet 2 inches wide; there are 6 steps in this part of the passage; rise 6½ inches, breadth of tread 9½ inches. U, Principal Staircase, 19 feet 10 inches, by 13 feet; height of ceiling from stair landing, 11 feet 6 inches; breadth of landing 6 feet. V, Back Staircase, 10 feet 4 inches, by 8 feet 6 inches; height of ceiling from stair landing 10 feet 10 inches; breadth of landing 4 feet. W, Stair, leading to the Attic floor, to be carried over the passage T; length of steps 3 feet 3 inches, breadth 9 inches, rise 7 inches, lighted by a roof light, 4 feet 9 inches long, by 2 feet 3 inches wide.

BACK ELEVATION.- The whole extent of the Back Elevation is 89 feet 6 inches. The wing to the left is 32 feet 6 inches wide, and 32 feet 9 inches high from the ground to the top of the battlements, and 41 feet 4 inches high to the ridge of the roof. The windows on the ground floor are 10 feet 3 inches high, by 4 feet 9 inches wide, each being divided into four compartments by a mullion and transom, 5½ inches thick. The top of each window is crowned with a tablet, which reaches 2 feet below the top of the window. The windows on the chamber floor are 20 feet 9 inches from the ground, their height is 7 feet, and width 4 feet. The wing to the right is 30 feet 2 inches wide, and 34 feet 6 inches high from the ground to the gable top; and to the top of the chimney stalk 40 feet 2 inches, to the top of the side walls 25 feet 3 inches, and to the ridge of the roofs over the windows to the right hand 28 feet 4 inches, and to the left 30 feet. The windows on the ground floor are 7 feet 10 inches high, the one in the centre is 3 feet 9 inches wide, the other two are blank windows, each 2 feet 4 inches wide. The top of each window is crowned with a tablet, which reaches 1 feet 9 inches below the top of the window. The windows on the chamber floor are 17 feet 6 inches from the ground, their height is 6 feet, and the width of the one in the centre is 3 feet 6 inches, the other two being 2 feet 2 inches; these windows are blank. The gable top, which stands behind the wing to the right, is 26 feet 9 inches wide, and 41 feet 4 inches high to the top of the roof, and 47 feet 3 inches high from the ground to the top of the chimney stalks. The recesses, terminating at the top with Gothic heads, are 3 feet high, by 6 inches wide. The central compartment or staircase is 13 feet 9 inches from the level of the ground, its height is 14 feet 9 inches, width 9 feet 6 inches, divided into six compartments by two mullions, 11 inches thick, anbd transoms 5½ inches thick. The dormer window over the staircase is 4 feet high, by 3 feet 2 inches wide, its roof being 6 feet 3 inches above the top of the battlements. The dormer window, on the wing to the left, is of the same dimensions. The window on the ground floor between the staircase and wing to the right, is 8 feet 9 inches high, by 2 feet 4 inches wide. The one on the chamber floor is 20 feet 9 inches from the ground; height 7 feet, width 2 feet 2 inches. The dormer window, over this window, is 4 feet high, by 2 feet 2 inches wide, and 6 feet from the top of the battlements to the ridge of its roof. The dormer window on the wing to the right, is of the same size. The turrets on the external angles are the same as those described on the Front Elevation.


DETAILS.- The drawing marked A, is part of an elevation of the Porch on the Elevation [First picture, Part I] showing the form of the mouldings, tracery, and other ornaments. The part of the entrance door shown gives the form of one of the upper pannels; it is divided by a mullion into two compartments, terminating at the top with Gothic heads, filled in with cusps. It is intended that the arrowlets in the octagonal buttresses be cut through, and also the pannels in the enriched battlements. The drawing marked B, is part of the plan of the Porch, showing part of the entrance door, side lights, and inside finishing. The small columns, placed in the openings on the flanks, to be finished with bases and capitals, to the same height as those in front; the openings to terminate with trefoil arches, surmounted by a main arch and spandrels similar to the front. The cornice and battlements on the flanks to be the same as in front, with the exception of the escutcheon. The drawing marked C, shows part of the frieze and cornice over the oriel windows on the ground floor. The cusped pannels in the frieze are called by the name of quartrefoils. The drawing marked D, shows part of the frieze and cornice over the oriel window above the Porch. The pannels in the frieze are called trefoils. The drawing marked E, is a section of the cornice, and part of the frieze C. The cornice for D is the same, with the exception of the first member, and the moulding in the pannels of the frieze, which is smaller.


PLAN OF ROOF.- In order to make the drawing as comprehensive as possible, the Plan is arranged in such a manner as to show one-half of the roof finished, and the other half in the naked rafters; the space between the rafters is 1 foot 3 inches. The wall plates are 11 inches broad, and 1½ inches thick. The roofs of the dormer windows are supported by trimmers, properly framed into the rafters; the perpendicular spaces on the front and sides of those windows may be finished with wood, or lath and plaster, with mastic on the outside, so as to correspond with the stone walls. The form of the chimney stalks, gutters, and platforms, will be understood by the drawing. The water may be carried from the roof by cast-iron pipes, built into the walls. Great attention should be paid to roofs, in having the gutters and other receptacles for water properly arranged, so that they may not be liable to be choked up, as the comfort and stability of the building depends greatly on the walls being kept dry.


Figure 1, represents the elevation of a part of the roof, on the back wing to the left hand, showing its height from the upper side of the joists to the platform, also the rafters, forming part of the octagonal part of the roof, and likewise the framing of the dormer window; the sill of the dormer window is 1 foor 2 inches broad, by 3 inches thick; the upright standards or jambs in front are 8 inches broad, by 3½ inches thick, the lintel 9 inches deep, by 4½ inches thick, and the rafters are 5 inches broad, by 2 inches thick.

Figure 2, represents the plan of the octagonal part of the roof, showing the method of finding the length of the different rafters, and likewise the different bevels. A, B, and C, on the Plan, show the rafters on the central part of the octagon; the line A, B, being equal to the perpendicular height from the ridge of the roof to the seat of the rafter, and B, C, equal to the distance from the bottom of the perpendicular line to the extremity of the seat on the wall plate, join A, C; and the line thus joined, is the length from the ridge of the roof to the wall plate. The lines drawn perpendicular from the seat of the jack rafters, on the hips, give the length of the different rafters required, and also the bevels at top and bottom for cutting the joints. B D E, on the Plan, show the rafters on the diagonal sides of the octagon; the line B D being equal to the perpendicular height of the roof, and B E equal to the distance from the bottom of the perpendicular line to the extremity of the seat on the wall plate; join D E, which gives the length from the ridge to the wall plate. The lines drawn perpendicular from the seat of the jack rafters on the hip and valley rafter, give the different lengths required, and also the bevels at top and bottom for cutting the joints. F G H, on the Plan, show the rafters on the square part of the roof, the line F G being equal to the perpendicular height of the roof; G H, equal to the distance from the bottom of the perpendicular line to the extremity of the seat on the wall plate, join F H, which gives the length of the rafters on the square part of the roof; the length of the jack rafters is found by perpendicular lines drawn from the seat on the hip and valley rafter, and also the different bevels required for cutting the joints.

Figure 3, represents the elevation of one half of the octagonal part of the roof, the other half of the drawing shows the form of the couples on the square part of the roof, and also a side view of the framing of the dormer window.

Figure 4, represents the plan of the octagonal part of the roof, and shows the method of finding the lengths of the hip and valley rafters, also the various bevels, and backing of the hips. A B C, on the Plan, shows one of the rafters on the square part of the roof, with the seat of the sill and lintel of the dormer window marked by dotted lines. D E F, on the Plan, shows the method of finding the length of the hip rafters on the octagonal part of the roof, draw D E perpendicular to D F, make D E equal to the height of the roof, join E F, which gives the length of the hip required. G H I is the hip rafter on the square part of the roof, the length of it is found by the same rule as the former. To find the backing of the hips.-From any point in I G, draw a b perpendicular to I G, cutting the line at the extremity of the seats of the bottom of the rafters in a c and b c, then a b c will be the angle required. The backing of the hip rafter E F is shown on the drawing in the same manner. The method of finding the side bevels on the different rafters, is shown on the drawing by bevels applied to the various joints.

Part I: Ground Plan and Front Elevation.
Part II: Chamber Floor, Back Elevation, Details and Plan of Roof.
Part III: Details of Library, Section and Details, and Details.

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